A whole new dimension…

… of the answer to the question about « life, the universe and everythig. »

It reminds me the idea that if you ask a horse to draw a god, it will draw a horse.  

Anyway I am surprised I discover this about « 42 » so late. 

Teasing on Observing Runs…

As announced a few days ago, the Observing Sites page is back online. It is a very basic and functional page for now. There are still a few things in the Javascript Framework I use (Vue.js) I need to explore. In particular: the possibility to edit and add observing sites isn’t yet available.

But here is something I am busy with right now: Observing Runs, for which I needed Observing Sites. Looks like a online version of iObserve… 

A very first selection of an observing site inside the Observing Runs dashboard.

I know, I am building again a 3-columns-with-topbar layout… But I think this is clearly the most adapted to a pro app like that. More to come soon! 

Coming soon, a new Observing Sites page on arcsecond.io

I am actively working on arcsecond.io… and there is a lot going on behind the scene. One thing is new though: I start to enjoy front-end dev for the first time (you know, the mix of html, javascript and css), thanks to the excellent framework Vue.js.

Coming very soon, a brand new observing sites page! Stay tuned.

Making an auxiliary app about Observing Sites…

… on the road to iObserve 2!  

As you certainly know if you read this blog a bit, here and especially here, I am preparing, slowly, a version 2 of my famous app for astronomers: iObserve. One key thing about it are observatories, over and over again. The problem of managing different places, being able to record your own places, possibly sharing them etc, exists since the inception of the app, when it was only in a widget form… 

In the course of the years, I’ve developed a lot of things about it and never found it entirely satisfactory. Then came arcsecond.io

Arcsecond.io was first intended to be the backend for a much lighter iObserve client. But it appears it can solve a lot of things! And the first thing it can solves is to be the one-place-to-go for everything about observatories in the world. 

Hence, one of the primary mission of arcsecond.io is to record, store, share, make available all the information about such places.

And the only way to correctly develop, test, bullet-proof the observing sites at arcsecond.io is to build an app, using the arcsecond.swift and SwiftAA sdks. So here it is, for the visible part:

Of course, as soon as it gets ready to edit and display useful things about all observatories, and you can add your own etc, you’ll get your hands on it! 

 

 

Closing sources of arcsecond.io… for now

I’ve decided to close the sources of arcsecond.io for now. It’s been quite a while since I started to think about it.

Two main reasons. First, the opening of the sources had strictly none of the expected effects, that is, to gather people around the project, even just a few. None. Second, arcsecond.io is a fairly large project, some said too much. And before I find a satisfactory plan of splitting / simplification / whatever, I prefer to make my business on my own.

However, if anyone is interested to really participate, I’ll be happy to include him as a member of the GitHub project.

One small step for a developer…

… but quite a milestone in my master plan (see previous post). After about a year of (discrete periods of intense) work, I’ve decided that SwiftAA, the best collection of astronomical algorithms on Swift, hit the 2.0-alpha stage.

SwiftAA is intended to be the underlying code framework of all scientific computations of the next version of iObserve. With it, I’ll be able to provide tons of details about many objects, and especially about Solar System objects, which are clearly missing in the current app.

It’s an alpha stage, of course. It means a lot of details need to be polished: iOS version polishing, more unit tests, a more consistent handling of numeric types etc. But all of the C++ code is wrapped in Objective-C(++) code, and all that old-style code mimicking the original AA+ one is now « Swifted ». That is, it has been elevated to a lot higher level of expressive formulation.

Complexity remains, since the solar system isn’t quite easy to simplify. Hence, when one has the goal of minimizing the amount of lines of code, to extract the most of it, things aren’t easy to read at first. 

But there is a Swift Playground for those interested to learn. I wish I had more time for making this Playground more « ready to use ». But as for now, you need to dive a bit into the thing and the project to actually understand it. But time will come, I’ll prepare a better one.


In my website stats, I noticed that some people keep talking about iObserve, which is great. One post however mentioned the wish to have a Linux version of it. Those interested in what happens here @ onekilopars.ec probably understood that it is also part of the master plan. But current web-based technologies to make cross-platforms apps are difficult to put in place. I’ve tried about 6-7 times. But I don’t give up! 


I’ve received about 30 new observatories to be included in the next version of iObserve. That’s really great, as it is the sign of a strong usage of the app (more than 15k downloads so far). They are all in my list of to-dos, but I must say that it is sometimes hard to be motivated to finish this new new version, and I am late. But it will come! 

 

Master plan of the software department @ onekilopars.ec

Software is amazing, because it let you create your own world. This is the world as I see it in the future. I learned so much by creating iObserve (over the course of the past years…). And as in science, the main lesson was that I didn’t know much actually… 

Hence, since I love challenges, I decided to dive into new questions:

  • new language for the app iObserve
  • new architecture for the app
  • own backend service with specific language
  • start cloud service with storage and online DB
  • extract as many macOS components from app into open-source libraries
  • finally implement dreamed features (night logs, observation simulator…)
  • I’m sure something is missing… 

If someone want to share the bumps ahead on the road, he|she is most welcome.

Clear skies to everyone!

P.S. By the way, arcsecond.io just migrated to Python3…