Swift 2 announced during Apple WWDC Keynote!

Not really convinced by MUSIC like myself? Not a problem, we have one major announcement for the developer sleeping in you: Swift 2! Moreover, Swift will be open source! Even better! Swift 2 will be open source, and available on Linux! Time for you to start looking at it, no?

<personal ad>SiftVOTable is an ongoing dev of yours truly to have a VOTable-parser in Swift, cool, isn’t it?</personal ad>

Now, the key thing is to know whether the release of Swift on Linux will also include the famous « Foundation » library. The blog post above only says it will include « standard libraries ». But Swift, like Objective-C, isn’t very powerful without the famous Apple libraries Cocoa and CocoaTouch. 

At the foundation of Cocoa(Touch), there is Foundation. And that would be a minimum to start writing server apps with Swift. I may need to reconsider what I am writing for iObserve 2…

Do not hesitate to leave comments about it below!

QLFits3 updated (v3.1.1)

I just discovered I left a damn NSLog instruction in the QLFits3 implementation. It was clearly slowing down every preview the generator was producing (in addition of filling up your logs).

You should quickly reinstall it. Here is the one-liner for that:

curl -fsSLk https://raw.github.com/onekiloparsec/QLFits/master/Scripts/install.sh | sh

Vibrant KPCTabsControls are coming

An interesting feature request from a user of my power tabs KPCTabsControl on OSX: make them vibrant in Yosemite. The effect is subtle, but I managed to implement it. It requires some additional work though before release, to make sure the core feature of KPCTabsControl continues to work on older versions. 

On Yosemite, make sure to use a NSVisualEffectView as container view, and that this view is layer-backed. The demo app will have everything for you to check.

QLFits3 has now options!

That’s it. I managed to implement options for QLFits3, thanks to the fantastic help from the BetterZipQL developer (Thanks Robert!). 

It has been quite an interesting challenge! Now a tiny “config” app is bundled with the QL generator and is running un background, listening for some custom URL scheme whose content is formatted in such way it is transformed into key-value pair, which in turns is saved inside a pref file… 

Let me know if it works for you! The one-line installer:

curl -fsSL https://raw.github.com/onekiloparsec/QLFits/master/Scripts/install.sh | sh

QLFits 3 options

QLFits is certainly the most well known of of my software. It all started just before iObserve, actually, back in 2010! Long ago, when QLFits was in version 2.0 (or even before, I think), there was the possibility to customise the output. This is a requested feature again. And indeed, some people want to customise the output, not really the look of it, but rather the presence, or not, of the headers, by defaults.

Given the very small amount of documentation that Apple is providing on that matter, I am struggling a bit alone. However, I got help from the developer of another great QuickLook plugin: BetterZipQL. You must definitely grab it. It’s free, and provide invaluable insight of your zipped files.

SwiftVOTable

Let me introduce a new open-source project: SwiftVOTable, a simple VOTable parser written in Swift. It is really work in progress, but I am developing it for a coming app… Pretty nice to learn Swift finally!