News from the development department…

Two months already since I made iObserve free, and a month since I started to work in my new startup. And a month without any code! How bizarre! Sorry guys, but as you may have guessed, I made no progress at all on the iObserve front. In fact, during the last month I had only my 7-years old MacBook Pro. Tough to run Xcode and code confortably with it. Now that I received the latest high-end Retina, things have much improved!

Here is the situation at onekiloparsec’s:

  • iObserve 1.5 is still ongoing. Sky maps coming, along with various bugfixes coming, especially that factor 15 for Right Ascensions when entering coordinates manually. I was planning to put in place an update mechanism outside the MacAppStore, but given the time it takes, I’ll skip it for now. So expect a regular update in the MAS. I can’t make plans for when, but this is definitely on top of the list.
  • I’ve received a request to support PixInsight XISF in QLFits. That’s very interesting, as I didn’t know about before. I’ll have to check that. Love new stuff.
  • KPCTabsControl has been updated to play better with AutoLayout projects, because of a developer request. Great spirit among developers around the world; open source can be really cool sometimes.
  • SwiftAA is stucked in between version 1.0 and 2.0. I really wish I could finish this soon. This is key for the future, but I am stuck on how I should translate pure C++ style / syntax in the most useful / modern Swift style and syntax. Life can be hard sometimes. 😉
  • Because of SwiftAA is stuck, so is iObserve 2 too… But anyway, this new app depends on the development of arcsecond.io. And I am wondering I could write things in Swift. Probably not on the server side (even if it is possible right now).

But you know what? I’ve been thinking a lot about arcsecond.io lately. I regularly receive emails from the backend about this or this not working well (for instance, duplicate Observatories, yes, I look at you, Crete). I am all aware of it! And I need to do something about it, definitely. Enough said for now. More on that later.

Most welcome to send comments and feedbacks if you can help or discuss. Stay tuned, as always.

Quick update for QLFits3

When an error prevents CFITSIO to open the FITS file, the error message of its status is brought up to the user level, for an easier debugging.

As usual, to install or re-install the latest version of QLFits3, use the one-line installer:

curl -fsSLk https://raw.github.com/onekiloparsec/QLFits/master/Scripts/install.sh | sh

 

iObserve Touch 1.1 submitted

That’s it, finally. iObserve for iPad version 1.1 has been pushed to Apple for review. It should be available within a week. Be aware that this new version drops the support for iOS6 and iOS7! It is an iOS8-only update. Let me know if this is a big issue for you, since it is a survival decision for me…

I mean, I update iObserve on desktop, iObserve on iPad, QLFits on demand, trying to make some advances in Swift, work hard on my web app PicoLegends… and finally spend some time on iObserve Server (I’ll post the beta URL soon) and iObserve 2 on desktop, all of this in spare time. Who said software is not a way of life!

QLFits3 has now options!

That’s it. I managed to implement options for QLFits3, thanks to the fantastic help from the BetterZipQL developer (Thanks Robert!). 

It has been quite an interesting challenge! Now a tiny “config” app is bundled with the QL generator and is running un background, listening for some custom URL scheme whose content is formatted in such way it is transformed into key-value pair, which in turns is saved inside a pref file… 

Let me know if it works for you! The one-line installer:

curl -fsSL https://raw.github.com/onekiloparsec/QLFits/master/Scripts/install.sh | sh

QLFits 3 options

QLFits is certainly the most well known of of my software. It all started just before iObserve, actually, back in 2010! Long ago, when QLFits was in version 2.0 (or even before, I think), there was the possibility to customise the output. This is a requested feature again. And indeed, some people want to customise the output, not really the look of it, but rather the presence, or not, of the headers, by defaults.

Given the very small amount of documentation that Apple is providing on that matter, I am struggling a bit alone. However, I got help from the developer of another great QuickLook plugin: BetterZipQL. You must definitely grab it. It’s free, and provide invaluable insight of your zipped files.