arcsecond.io stands on its two feet: ‘api’ and ‘www’

Finally, after the last two or three weeks struggling with host names redirections, and my first steps with Google’s AngularJS framework, I happy to present the two faces of arcsecond.io. One side for « API« : a pure modern, easy to use, integrated RESTful data-access. And one side ‘www‘ where I am building a webapp for the users will be able to amazing things  … but shhht, this is secret for now. But our ambition is high! 

arcsecond.io v1 (alpha)

Here is a coming service: arcsecond.io (which replace the ugly eclipt.is I mentioned in a previous blog post). APIs aren’t ready yet, but I intend to give access to basic properties of objects by the end of the month. At least, you can enjoy the front end. 🙂 

arcsecond.io aims at providing browsable APIs where each piece of astronomical information has its own Uniform Resource Locator (a.k.a. URL). SIMBAD, NED, exoplanet.eu, JPL Horizons, astro telegrams are among the sources of information that arcsecond.io intend to unify. Because we believe in the force of integration.

Trackbacks and the usual tendency of developers to promise too much

While developing this new website, I was wondering from where my visitors were coming. The squarespace site make it easy to grab this information. And clearly, people find it directly. 

This corresponds basically to what I think since the beginning: iObserve gets its reputation (and downloads) mostly through word-of-mouth. That’s great because I have not enough time and energy to spend for promotion. I did it once however in the famous ‘astrobetter.com‘ website: here, with a follow-up here.

By reading again the comments, I am horrified by the amount of things I promised I’ll develop inside iObserve. These are usually still in the to-do list, but overwhelmed by the new stuff. Achieving a complete release of a software is an exercise of trying to put a storm of complexity into a fairly solid box, and say: look, you can now surf on it! That’s particularly true for an app such as iObserve which has more than 80k lines of code (and many custom connectors to crazy webservices, yes, I’m looking at you JPL horizons…).

The journey is far from finished!