The v0.8 software malediction (and resolutions for 2019)…

Life in Software-land follows the rhythm of version updates. And big jumps in numbers is usually reflecting what happens under the hood (except for the Linux kernel sometimes): big changes, big rewrites, big decisions, all of them at the same time. Long ago in my own Astro-Software-land, I was developing my famous macOS app: iObserve, which remained in the swamp of the beta phase for a long serie of months. (The beta phase is this period of time before the confidence on the capability of the mentionned software being actually useful reaches an « acceptable » level for the developer.)

iObserve never reached the v0.9. I had to stop development, rewrite a big part of the app, and jump right into 1.0 (I then submitted it to the Mac App Store).

v0.7.16. That’s the current version of arcsecond.io (see the changelog). Arcsecond.io was meant to become my new flagship software for the years to come. Still, I hit the v0.8 malediction. I hit it hard. I feel that a lot has to be rewritten. The good news is that the backend is solid, I’m very happy with it.

But I need to not only rewrite lots of the front-end, but actually rethink the whole shape of the webapp I intend to build. Too many things in the pipeline, but at the same time, nothing really finished. Damn.

I don’t know why it always happens around the v0.8. A kind of teenager crisis for a software. The time where you have exhausted your young energy, and start to think this isn’t the right direction, and something must change.

It’s hard to convince a developer he didn’t develop the right thing. But when this developer is yourself, and you invested a big chunk of a whole year into it, it is rough. At least, I must say I am not denying it anymore. It took quite a few months to really ask for feedback, but I did it, and the results of the votes are clear: I must continue to build new versions of iObserve…

Everything’s inside the meaning of « new versions »… This is where it is interesting to think as a product maker. What is iObserve ? An app that embedd into the same « workspace » a bunch of finely-crafted algorithms and visualisations combined with professional archival data, to let people think and prepare better their astronomical observations.

(Okay, okay! I heard it. It must work offline too.)

Fine. Let’s do that. But the success of iObserve is also the result of a few unplanned features nobody asked for. Say, I have a few in my pocket.

Resolutions for 2019. Actually, only one, which encompasses all others: focus. Really focus on the right thing, and nothing more.

Clear skies to everyone!

Arcsecond.io 0.6: Team Size Doubling + iObserve on the web !

This is a milestone for Arcsecond ! I am happy to announce that Eric Depagne, currently astronomer at SAAO/SALT has agreed to join his forces to arcsecond.io. His expertise with Python will help a lot on the backend, but I don’t expect him to remain within the boundaries of it!

Moreover, we releases iObserve on the web ! Not as feature-rich as the macOS app yet. But already new features that will belong only to Arcsecond: Night Logs (in prep) and Data !

Freely regsiter in www.arcsecond.io and tell us what you think !

iObserve on the web is coming

Well, winter is already there, anyway. So now, iObserve is coming … on the web. #GameOfCurves

For those who don’t know yet, iObserve on the web is called arcsecond.io. You can already checkit out here.

I am very proud of the progresses. But there is a lot to iron out (I had to work on various API endpoints to make it work: /observingsites, /observingruns, /nightlogs, /observations, /users, /telescopes).

But I can’t wait to share with you a (debug) screenshot of the current state of it on my machine. Feel free to spread the word!

My blog is my code (quick updates)

I should take the time to annouce a bit more often the releases of my various softwares. But software is a mean of expression by itself, in my humble opinion, when practiced everyday. Don’t you read software? … My blog is my code, and this blog is my secondary blog, talking about the first one.

Anyway, please be aware that arcsecond.io is progressing well. It isn’t still ready for a full-blast communication pushed into professional tubes though. But time will come.

In particular, note the fusion of the Objects and Exoplanets page (which are kinda of object, aren’t they?…). It makes the navigation a lot easier. Moreover, Exoplanet Transits have been also added. Pretty nice. Screenshot below, but judge by yourself directly in this example.

 Yes, I usually look for icecream colors for the beta banner... Don't you like this Strawberry-Pistache ? Yes, I usually look for icecream colors for the beta banner… Don’t you like this Strawberry-Pistache ?

Moreover APIs are slowly maturing, and some API endpoints are now in pretty good shape. Obviously that includes /observingsites, /objects and /exoplanets. I am working full-speed on /observingruns and /nightlogs right now. But /datasets is also pretty nice already (although not yet complete).

To follow all the progresses see my third blog… the arcsecond.io changelog!

In the meantime, I also released a small update of SwiftAA (v2.0.1) to fix some warnings, making sure it is fully compatible with latest Xcode, and applied a small bugfix about the visibility of a special method (that should be kept internal for that matter). Check it out on GitHub!

I am also busy with new adventures for real professional activities this time. But I tend to usually mutualise the benefits, to increase the pace of releases.

Oh by the way, I am preparing a link between arcsecond.io and iObserve ! It’s time for iObserve’s users to submit new observatories and observing sites not in the app but rather in arcsecond.io. They will further be importable inside the app. It will be great. The benefit is that: it is not manual anymore (which is good for me), but is directly accessible and shared with everybody !

Batch of small updates from the software dpt.

I may not update this blog very often, but things keep moving forward!

First, I’ve fixed an important bug in SwiftAA, the iOS/macOS framework of astronomical algorithms. There was a confusion on ecliptic coordinates, which was then propagating to other coordinates, and making impossible to have reliable times of Rise, Transit and Set for celestial objects. What a pity if you couldn’t compute these times with SwiftAA! It is now fixed. Check the release. Even if it takes time, I keep moving forward to reach the 2.0 milestone.

The other updates are about arcsecond.io. I made progresses in many compartments: Datasets, Night Logs, Observing Runs, Profiles. Objects page, Publications etc etc. The new root page now has a Google-like search field. For the exoplanets side, I’m working on something very cool, but it isn’t ready yet (planned for v0.3).

You can check the changes and the improvements brought by every release in the dedicated Changelog page.

As for iObserve, I keep receiving new observatories. Thanks to all. I may consider an update of iObserve to use observatories in arcsecond.io once back from vacations. Better not promise anything though, I know how it goes… 

 

Teasing on Observing Runs…

As announced a few days ago, the Observing Sites page is back online. It is a very basic and functional page for now. There are still a few things in the Javascript Framework I use (Vue.js) I need to explore. In particular: the possibility to edit and add observing sites isn’t yet available.

But here is something I am busy with right now: Observing Runs, for which I needed Observing Sites. Looks like a online version of iObserve… 

A very first selection of an observing site inside the Observing Runs dashboard.

I know, I am building again a 3-columns-with-topbar layout… But I think this is clearly the most adapted to a pro app like that. More to come soon! 

Making an auxiliary app about Observing Sites…

… on the road to iObserve 2!  

As you certainly know if you read this blog a bit, here and especially here, I am preparing, slowly, a version 2 of my famous app for astronomers: iObserve. One key thing about it are observatories, over and over again. The problem of managing different places, being able to record your own places, possibly sharing them etc, exists since the inception of the app, when it was only in a widget form… 

In the course of the years, I’ve developed a lot of things about it and never found it entirely satisfactory. Then came arcsecond.io

Arcsecond.io was first intended to be the backend for a much lighter iObserve client. But it appears it can solve a lot of things! And the first thing it can solves is to be the one-place-to-go for everything about observatories in the world. 

Hence, one of the primary mission of arcsecond.io is to record, store, share, make available all the information about such places.

And the only way to correctly develop, test, bullet-proof the observing sites at arcsecond.io is to build an app, using the arcsecond.swift and SwiftAA sdks. So here it is, for the visible part:

Of course, as soon as it gets ready to edit and display useful things about all observatories, and you can add your own etc, you’ll get your hands on it! 

 

 

Master plan of the software department @ onekilopars.ec

Software is amazing, because it let you create your own world. This is the world as I see it in the future. I learned so much by creating iObserve (over the course of the past years…). And as in science, the main lesson was that I didn’t know much actually… 

Hence, since I love challenges, I decided to dive into new questions:

  • new language for the app iObserve
  • new architecture for the app
  • own backend service with specific language
  • start cloud service with storage and online DB
  • extract as many macOS components from app into open-source libraries
  • finally implement dreamed features (night logs, observation simulator…)
  • I’m sure something is missing… 

If someone want to share the bumps ahead on the road, he|she is most welcome.

Clear skies to everyone!

P.S. By the way, arcsecond.io just migrated to Python3…